The Imaginary Realms of
Gilbert M. Stack

Subtitle

History

History

Recent

Medieval Myths and Mysteries by Dorsey Armstrong

This is one of the most delightful Great Courses books I’ve yet listened to. At its essence, Armstrong picks up a bunch of images from the Middle Ages that have filtered down to our modern society and explores both the modern story and the actual medieval roots. Some are about famous figures—Robin Hood and King Arthur. Others are about magical creatures like the Questing Beast. Still others are about events like the Black Death or institutions like the Templars. And at each point your understanding of the people who lived during the Middle Ages will grow, your understanding of how stories come into existence will evolve, and your appreciation of this rich and wondrous period of our history will expand.


In Alpha Order by Author


Years that Changed History: 1215 by Dorsey Armstrong

I love history books that connect events happening in one part of the world with another, even if the only connection is that they are occurring at the same time. That’s what Dorsey Armstrong does here. She takes snapshots around the world 1215 to show how fundamental change was happening everywhere: Magna Carta, the Fourth Lateran Council, Genghis Kahn, Japan, Africa, and North America. It’s a delightful little set of lectures.


Turning Points in Middle Eastern History by Eamon Gearon

Let’s be clear about this—this collection of lectures is both well written and very interesting, but it also seems to be misnamed. First off, it begins with Mohammad and focuses very much on the growth of Islam as a political (and religious) force. Nothing that happens before Mohammad is even mentioned. It also covers events that happen in North Africa, Spain, the Balkans and Eastern Europe, areas that we do not classically think of as the Middle East. This led me to think that what Gearon was really writing was a history of Islam, but it’s truly that either as it doesn’t cover important events that brought Islam further around the globe.


The focus is also very heavily on the Middle Ages, and as such I thought was very light on the twentieth century. I would have liked to see an analysis of the ousting of the Shah of Iran and the resulting Hostage Crisis and radicalization of that country. The two Persian Gulf Wars also would have made interesting material. And I could go on. So this is a highly informative book about Islam in the Middle East, North Africa, and neighboring regions that would seriously benefit from an addendum that covers the region since World War I. This was a great start, but I feel it ended prematurely.


Ireland: A History from the Twelfth Century to the Present Day by Paul Johnson

This a quick history of the complex struggle for Irish independence—a subject I do not know as much about as I would like to. It starts with a swift overview of Ireland and England in the Middle Ages which showed what I considered to be a moment or two of clear English bias by the author. For example, Johnson states that the introduction of English law benefited everyone in Ireland—an assertion many would argue with. The Irish had a well-developed legal system that was complicated but governed their affairs well into the period of English conquest. It was remarkably different than the English justice system, but that does not mean that many were not well-served by it. The English system was administered by the English and biased in favor of English (and later Protestant) subjects. It’s hard to say with a straight face that all the Irish benefited from the transition to the new legal system.


Similarly, I felt that Johnson went out of his way to justify the slaughter of Irish garrisons and civilian populations by Cromwell—beyond simply setting a context that this sort of behavior happened elsewhere as well. It worries me when I see bias like this in the areas I know about, because it makes me wonder what I’m missing in the areas I’m ignorant regarding.


That being said, this is quick passage through the early modern and modern efforts of many Irish to gain independence. It shows how the forces of nationalism found support among both Catholics and Protestants before being increasingly divided over the issue of union. It also showed how England fumbled many opportunities to improve this situation. The Land Law issues (first stealing almost all the land in Ireland from Catholics and then the efforts to restore the land to Catholics) was among the most interesting to me.


1066: The Year That Changed Everything by Jennifer Paxton

This short entry in the Great Courses series provides a nice tight account of William’s famous conquest of England. The narrative is fairly conservative/traditional in covering the actual conquest. If you know a lot about the Conquest and the political situation in England, Normandy and the Viking territories of the north, then this account will likely be too short for you. I found the greatest value in Paxton’s analysis of the importance and impact of the Conquest for later generations and wish she had spent more time on it. Overall, this is well worth the three hours it takes to listen to it—especially if you have little knowledge of how the Normans came to rule England.

The History of Spain by Joyce E. Salisbury

I’ve been very interested in the history of Spain since my Freshman year in college when I took a course on the Reconquista and Salisbury does a wonderful job of detailing the history of this fascinating peninsula from the earliest human peoples to the modern day. Her lectures are engaging and informative and the course moves very quickly. If you have an interest in Spain, this is a great place to flesh out your understanding of its history.